Grooming Kit Essentials for Men

Feel confident all the time with these grooming kit essentials that you should carry in your bag wherever you are.

Comb or Brush
Find a comb that can easily fit in your bag’s pocket for convenience or a brush that will work with curly hair. Stylists recommend a comb with both coarse and fine teeth for precision, or boar hair bristles for the brush that are gentle on the scalp.

Nail File and Clippers
If you don’t have time to get your manicure and pedicure done, you should bring a compact nail grooming kit with you that includes a nail clipper, tweezers, and nail file.

Razor
Some people have hair that grow so fast that they have to shave once every two days. If you’re one of those people, you should always take a safety razor or an electric razor in your bag. You never know when you need to meet a client or attend a meeting late in the day. Some shaving kits come with extra razor blades, shaving cream, and shaving brush for convenience.

Tissue or Moist Towelettes
What if you need to freshen up but the restroom is a mile away? Even if you do manage to reach the restroom when you have an upset stomach, there might not be enough paper towels for you to use, that is why you should always be prepared for the worst. Moist towelettes can be used as substitute to clean your hands, while compact tissues can be used to wipe oil, sweat or dirt from your face.

Toothbrush and Toothpaste
You’ll never know if you will be invited by a client to have dinner or your friends to party after office hours, so you should always bring a compact toothbrush and toothpaste in your bag. Purchase a toothbrush that comes with a removable cap or a plastic receptacle for easy storage. If you can, you should also bring a mouthwash and floss.

Shower Gel and Facial Wash
If you travel a lot, you need to take a pouch containing all the essential toiletries, including a shower gel for easy use. It’s more practical than taking a bar of soap for bathing or washing. The facial wash is also essential especially if you need to spend more hours at work or outdoors, because it will help keep your face clean and oil-free whenever you’re dealing with a client or customer.

Who says only women should carry around grooming essentials? If you want to stay fresh, clean, and presentable all day, it’s important to bring grooming items wherever you go. You don’t need a large bag to make all of these fit, because you can purchase compact travel kits with all the essentials you will need for a challenging day at work.

How to Find and Prepare Baby’s First Solid Food

Preparing the baby’s first solid food can be an exciting but stressful time for first-time parents. How do you determine if your baby is ready for solid food? Which food can you safely prepare for your baby? And how will you introduce different solid food?

When to Feed the Baby
Most babies can be given their first solid food between 4 to 6 months. They are supposed to feed on breast milk or formula while still young because they do not have the capacity to chew and swallow solid food yet. Ask your pediatrician for advice when introducing the baby to solid food, because some doctors argue that babies should not be fed yet until they are about 6 months of age.

Your baby will also give you signs that he/she is ready for solid food. He/she might be ready if you see the following signs: baby can keep his/her head steady; baby can sit upright; baby is curious about food; baby has gained weight; and baby can use his/her tongue and mouth properly.

Recommended First Solid Food
If you think your baby is ready to eat his/her first solid food, you should look for food that can be safely digested by baby’s sensitive tummy. Most babies can easily digest pureed single-ingredient solid food, such as squash, potato, banana, pear, peach, avocado, sweet potato, and brown rice cereal. Some doctors also recommend beef or chicken if the baby is still breastfeeding at 6 months.

Do not add salt, sugar, and other ingredients yet. Observe baby’s reaction to food and signs of allergies. Later, you can introduce known allergens, such as wheat, fish, eggs, soy and peanut butter, to determine if baby reacts to any one of them. If a family member, however, is known to be allergic to some food, you should ask the pediatrician about coming up with a feeding plan and blood tests for the baby.

Introducing Solid Food
Most parents start by preparing the food themselves to make sure that there are no additives to the food, although commercial baby food is generally safe if you read the labels properly. Spoon-feed the infant with the puree, limiting each feeding to 1 to 2 teaspoons.

You can also let the baby feed himself/herself by placing the food in front of him/her after nursing or bottle-feeding. Cereals should be diluted and mixed with milk or baby formula when introduced for the first time. If the baby does not seem interested, just let him/her smell it then try again later.

One feeding daily should be enough to allow the baby to practice chewing and swallowing. Remember to place the food in a feeding dish separate from the jar or container of baby food to prevent bacteria from accumulating. Leftovers from the feeding dish should not be stored and open food containers should be disposed one or two days after opening.

7 Treats for Everyone in Singapore with a Sweet Tooth

Most people would agree when we say that there’s nothing a sweet treat can’t cure. It lifts up moods, it’s a good reward after a long day, and it bonds relationships. In short, it’s what life basically is: sweet in just the right amount.

Singapore also has its local sweet indulgences and here’s a list that’s sure to leave you mouth-wateringly searching for your own source of sugar rush.

1. Peanut Paste
Made from what its name suggests, this is a popular dessert in Singapore. Known to have originated from Hong Kong, this treat has other varieties such as walnut paste, almond paste and sesame paste. With its smooth texture, it will give you the sweet boost for a long day.

2. Sago Gula Melaka
Palm sugar or typically known as Gula Melaka in Singapore is paired with sago and coconut milk in this treat. With its rich caramel flavor, it has that right mix of chewiness provided by the sago and the right amount of silkiness courtesy of the coconut milk.

3. Sugee Cake
A dense cake made from samonlina flour, a generous amount of butter, egg yolk and crushed almonds, this treat definitely satiates the craving for textures of the pastry kind. It’s basically a pound cake usually served at Christmas feasts shared by families.

4. Tau Huay
Served either hot or cold, this treat known as soya beancurd is made from boiled soy bean milk and a coagulant. It is cooled to a certain extent to achieve its pudding form, ready for serving.

5. Tau Suan
Basically made from split mung beans, this treat proves to be an efficient comfort food. Served hot, this treat has fried You Tiao or dough fritters complementing it with texture. This treat is prepared by boiling split mung beans with pandan, condensed with potato flour.

6. Pulut Hitam
Prepared by simmering black glutinous rice mixed with coconut milk and Gula Melaka or palm sugar, this treat is sure to have captured the hearts of locals and tourists alike. Known for its nutty flavor, it will sure give you that crazy kick of energy after a great meal.

7. Orh Nee
The main star of this treat is yam paste, which is first fried then blended. A smooth consistency lets you know you’ve blended it just right. Typically, ginkgo nuts and pumpkin accompany this treat to enhance its flavor and texture.

It goes without saying that almost every great meal needs a dessert to punctuate it with. No matter how tasty the main course is, the dessert always has the final say. So for those looking for the sugar rush they crave for, Singapore has local delicacies ready to tickle your taste buds giddy.

5 Instagram-Ready Spots in the Lion City

We live in a day and age where beauty is not only appreciated as it is, but is mandatory to snap a shot or two to decorate our feeds. Our online selves deserve a beautiful photo once in a while, and both locals and tourists alike can’t help but fill feeds with the beauty Singapore has to offer.

1. Public Transport
To start the list is one which our eyes have grown accustomed to yet never fail to tease our creative right lobes. With the lines and the right amount of grays, public transport stations of Singapore have monochrome patrons coming back for more shots – in different angles and poses.

2. Toa Payoh Playground or Dragon Playground
Who says we outgrow playgrounds? This spot offers colorful and sand-contrasted shots for photography enthusiasts. Singapore actually has four dragon playgrounds yet this remains the only one with sand. The others are dubbed with rubber play mats for added protection to kids. The dragon playground was spearheaded by the Housing and Development Board’s efforts way back 1979, with the Oriental dragon as model.

3. MCI Building
Those looking to add more color to their feeds should definitely pay the MCI building a visit. The vivid colors of green, red, yellow and blue partnered with sturdy walls of the building will surely gain a lot of good shots. Located along the Civic District trail, this infrastructure will surely leave your camera roll dripping with color.

4. Raffles Marina Lighthouse
If a touch of prestige is what you’re looking for in your photos, drop by Singapore’s Raffles Marina Lighthouse. Not only will your photos have that laid-back vacation vibe, but more importantly a tinge of these water-borne structures to contrast your in-land usuals. Nothing like a tinge of nature to balance all the infrastructures the life in the city has.

5. CHIJMES
This picturesque area of a complex of convent buildings is located in the heart of the city. It first started as a Catholic convent named as the Convent of the Holy Child Jesus (CHIJ). It was also called as Caldwell house, a convent quarters. An icon of history, religion and urbanized turn of the times, CHIJMES once served as a convent for 132 years. Today, the chapel is called the CHIJMES Hall, serving as a multi-purpose hall. The Caldwell House is now an art gallery, proving a convenient spot to visit for art enthusiasts.

We all have means and media with which to capture beauty we are blessed to enjoy today. Gadgets, camera, and such technological advancements all prove to be handy extensions of our mind’s eye in remembering spots that take our breath away.

Just don’t forget to put those down once in a while and indulge in the scene with our best gadget: our eyes.

You’re Not Truly East Asian Until You’ve Tried These Local Delicacies

Although there is a long list of iconic East Asian dishes (Dumplings or a Maki Roll, anyone?), there are also some local East Asian delicacies which silently fade in the background. Mere cultural delicacies truly reflect the richness of the East Asian palate. Perhaps you grew up eating some of these, or at least have heard of it from a friend who recently backpacked across the region.

They might not be as popular on a global scale, but they compose the unique East Asian flavors and taste.

Century egg – A more popular and common Chinese delicacy, century eggs are made from preserved duck or quailed eggs which is submerged in a saline solution for months long. The process gives the egg a creamy, jelly texture. But hey, at least it still tastes like your regular egg!

Chicken feet – Grilled and marinated chicken feet is popular among countries like South Korea and the Philippines. It tastes like your usual chicken, but it highlights the flavorful marinated skin and its chewy tendons. If anything, eating the dish can be considered a textural experience.

Bird’s nest soup – This is one popular dish in Chinese restaurants. Basically, it is a soup made of cooked bird spit. Swiftlets, which are common birds in China, are known to build their hard nests from their own gummy saliva. This ingredient is considered so rare that it is unsurprisingly expensive – but it is also rich in iron, potassium, calcium, and magnesium, so why not?

Natto – A nutritious Japanese dish, Natto is well-loved by children and adults alike. It is composed of fermented soybeans which infamously reeks (the scent is often compared to dirty, old socks). This is a common breakfast option served along with rice.

Durian – This fruit is branded in Southeast Asia as the King of Fruits because of its thorny husk, which can be likened to a crown. However, it is also notorious for its foul stench. A lot of hotels in the region even ban the fruit from being brought inside hotel rooms. If you can stand the penetrating smell, you’ll find that Durian tastes creamy and sweet!

Fish cake – A popular street food in Korea, skewered fish cake is well-loved by hungry people on the go. It is commonly made of processed seafood meat such as that of ground white fish. Fish cake can also be served in broth, which is perfect for the cold winter nights.

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